Behomm https://www.behomm.com/blog Behomm Blog News Tue, 18 Dec 2018 11:42:19 +0100 en hourly 1 https://behomm.com “I thought Behomm was elitist, for rich snobs” https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/“i_thought_behomm_was_elitist__for_rich_snobs”-21.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/“i_thought_behomm_was_elitist__for_rich_snobs”-21.html#comments Tue, 20 Feb 2018 09:00:00 +0100 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/“i_thought_behomm_was_elitist__for_rich_snobs”-21.html We recently found out that Behomm member Ringo Gomez-Jorge had written an article in the renown newspaper De Morgen about his experience as a Behommer. We loved how he explained his first “fears”, issues as security, aesthetics, “will my home be beautiful enough?” Happy to share with all of you his article. 

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We recently found out that Behomm member Ringo Gomez-Jorge had written an article about Behomm for De Morgen, renown Belgian newspaper, describing his experience as a Behommer. We didn’t know about this article and we were happily surprised to see how he explained the first feeling before joining, the uncertainty “I couldn’t believe that people with such beautiful homes would be able to enjoy our flat”... and how he has already done six exchanges in six months. Happy to share with all of you his article:

It’s an August Friday afternoon and I’m at home again, with my backpack laying on the living room floor, after a much-too-hot holiday in Madrid, and it strikes me how normal everything looks. Living room, kitchen, bathroom and bedroom – all in the same state I left them. There’s nothing to show anyone’s been here at all in my absence, except for a half-eaten maxi-pack of Special K breakfast cereal on the side, a white bottle of Dove body milk in the shower, and a plant on the window sill that isn’t normally there. Ana moved the plant because she thought it looked a bit sorry for itself, and she’s a landscape architect with green fingers. And that’s pretty much all I know about Ana, although I suspect she’s about fifty years old and likes to watch her figure.

Like me, Ana is a Behommer, as in we both use the internet platform Behomm, a website that enables you to swap your home with people from all over the world. And this is how Ana and I agreed to exchange homes for a few summer days. So she came to Borgerhout for the first time, to stay in my flat, and my girlfriend and I went to her luxurious apartment in Calle de Encarnación, close to the Royal Palace of Madrid. Hers is a beautiful apartment that’s half way between a boutique Spanish hotel and an Oriental courtyard. Think classical columns, colourful carpets, indoor palm plants, wooden blinds, ethnic lamps, that kind of thing. At night time, we took Ana’s advice and opened all the windows to feel the lovely breeze cool our sweltering backs.

At first I thought Behomm was elitist, simply for rich snobs
with fancy homes. On the websites says: ‘Taste has nothing
to do with luxury’ and this appears to be backed up in reality.

I’ve swapped homes six times in six months: Berlin three times, Amsterdam, London and Madrid. Copenhagen, Paris and Barcelona are also on the horizon. All because Behomm is so easy. Once you’re a member of the ‘community’, which is 95 euros for a first year trial and then costs 190 euros a year, you can easily scroll through properties to look at pictures and send messages to other members, to see if you can tempt them into a house swap. All arrangements are made individually between the two parties, so José and I agreed to leave our keys with a neighbour for our exchange, for example, and I met Iona in an East London coffee shop to swap keys and have a chat.

Antwerp vs. Berlin

You don’t always need to exchange homes for exactly the same period; you can also arrange non-simultaneous swaps. During my six-day trip to Berlin, for instance, hostess Peter wasn’t staying in Antwerp, but at his second home in Hamburg. He didn’t have time to enjoy Antwerp at the moment, so he keeps my flat in credit for another time. And when he does want to come and claim it, I’ll make sure I’m on holiday or staying with friends.

Even though I’m enjoying house swapping now, I must admit to judging the platform unfairly when my girlfriend first came up with the idea. Behomm isn’t just any house exchange website. The creators, a couple from Barcelona called Agustí Juste and Eva Calduch who run a graphic design agency together, had been arranging house swaps through other sites for years, but wasted a lot of time looking for homes with a similar sense of aesthetics. So in 2013 they started their own curated platform. They decide whether you can join their community or not. So, to be part of the Behomm story, you first need to be invited by a (distant) acquaintance before being approved by the platform, which is done based on your profile and home; or you can apply for an invitation at their platform. Only creatives and design lovers who live in tasteful homes are accepted.

You don’t always need to exchange homes for exactly the
same period; you can also arrange non-simultaneous swaps.

At first I thought this was complete elitist nonsense: a house exchange platform purely and simply for rich snobs with fancy homes. The website is bursting with all sorts of far-out interiors: from a 400-square-metre natural home in Thailand with a view of the sea, to a 200-square-metre loft in Brooklyn with a piano and zebra-print cushions. I don’t have any zebra-print cushions, and my windows look out over the main road to Turnhout, which all made it quite simple for me: I don’t belong to this ‘community’, and I don’t want to.

 

So it took a few months before I agreed to let my girlfriend upload some photos of our home to be approved by Behomm. Strangely enough, our apartment was accepted no problem. Okay, our home is 120 square metres, with a parquet floor and quite swanky furnishings, including a few large house plants and designer pieces by Maarten Van Severen (chair), Castiglioni (lamp) and Alvar Alto (three-legged table), but I wouldn’t call it a designer home. The fixtures and fittings leave something to be desired, too. All our wall sockets are skewwhiff, there are wall skirtings missing, and our kitchen floor is like a terrazzo from 1967, patchy cement included. It’s a flat that your average aunt or mother-in-law would describe as ‘Quirky. It’s definitely different.’

Behomm wants to offer people with a similar profession
and sense of taste the chance to travel in an enjoyable,
inspiring and affordable way.

So apparently Behomm isn’t so unbelievably elitist after all. The description on the website says: “Taste has nothing to do with luxury”, and this appears to be backed up in reality. Behomm wants to offer people with a similar profession and sense of taste the chance to travel in an enjoyable, inspiring and affordable way.

Misfit

Now, I’m still a Behomm misfit. José, Peter, Teresa, Berndt and Ana all have at least ten years more of work experience behind them, and undoubtedly healthier bank balances to match. Their homes easily surpass mine both in terms of budget and aesthetics. For example, José’s apartment is spread across two floors and looks out over the glorious Sarphatipark in De Pijp
in Amsterdam, pretty much the loveliest neighbourhood in the city’s canal district. Berndt’s, situated on Paul Linke Ufer in Kreuzberg, has a roof terrace and fashion shots all over the walls, including a life-size print of nudes wearing stormtrooper helmets by Helmut Newton, and a 1960s rocking chair in the shape of a plastic egg.

I was quite nervous for the first swap, because I couldn’t
believe that people with such beautiful homes would be able
to enjoy our flat.

Peter has a green velvet corner seat that I spent hours on, and a picnic bench dining table. The wooden floorboards in Teresa’s apartment, with two kitchens and two bathrooms in the heart of Kreuzberg, are lit by sunlight akin to an Instagram picture... so beautiful that I often think back to it.

 

To be honest, I have to say I was quite nervous for the first swap, because I couldn’t believe that people with such beautiful homes would be able to enjoy our flat. After leaving everything spick and span at home, and as my girlfriend and I settled down with a glass of white wine, left for us by the hostess, in José’s ample living room, we wondered what she’d be thinking of our small abode. Well, it turns out that José thinks it’s completely lovely and fine and fun. Just like Teresa and Ana and Iona and Peter.

From my six exchanges, I can safely say that design
elitism isn’t something that Behommers suffer with.

It’s striking how easily people can choke on their own prejudices. Well-to-do design lovers with all their airs and graces, don’t you know? From my six exchanges, I can safely say that design elitism isn’t something that Behommers suffer with. José thinks our flat’s rough edges are intriguing, Ana gushes about the Moroccan supermarkets on our road, Teresa loves our ceramic cups, and Peter finds it perfect for enjoying getting on with work. I give them all a few tips and they’re able to explore the city from my perspective. So we both experience different lives, just for a short while, and this has an incredibly inspiring effect.

 

Security

I don’t need to point out the main advantage of a house exchange: you get free accommodation, and a kitchen so you don’t need to eat out three times a day. This of course holds true for all house swap platforms, but with Behomm you can find homes you like faster. And more importantly: the fact that the platform is curated provides a sense of security. You’re swapping with other design lovers and not with some unknown shmuck or other, who might just empty the contents of their stomach on your floor after a heavy Saturday night out drinking. In an interview, founder Calduch explains that there have only been a few minor incidents; accidents, rather.

Behomm makes travelling more affordable. Because with Airbnb, the platform that offers accommodation at democratic prices, things can sometimes go awry, and the prices for accommodation in popular cities such as Amsterdam, Paris and Barcelona have already risen dramatically. A room in Amsterdam, for example, would recently have cost me 150 euros per night. Why? Because the owners know they can get away with it.

The fact that the platform is curated provides
a sense of security.

And they’re often not just people like you or me with a spare room anymore, but estate agents buying up premises to play hotel with. This kind of thing is unfortunately happening more and more. I recently booked a last-minute trip to Paris with friends, and ended up in an Airbnb apartment. As we checked out, there was a local family patiently waiting for us to leave. ‘Book unique homes and experience a city like a local,’ is what it says on the website. And we did indeed exchange a few friendly words as the keys were handed over.

Behomm does help enhance the sense of wanderlust,
and it’s incredibly addictive.

But Behomm doesn’t resolve everything. You definitely need to request a swap at least a month in advance, for instance, which means that Airbnb and the hotel sector do work faster. And, with just over 3,000 homes in 66 countries, the platform doesn’t cover all the corners of the world. You can also be rebuffed sometimes. To my great disappointment, for example, I have unfortunately not yet been able to find anyone willing to swap in Tokyo – so a flat in Antwerp does have its limitations on the house exchange market. But Behomm does help enhance the sense of wanderlust, and it’s incredibly addictive. My girlfriend recently received an exciting email from Amsterdam. A swap next week won’t work for us, but simply declining the offer seems silly. So we look at the photos: a fancy loft in the Oud-West neighbourhood. A non-simultaneous exchange then? Why not... a little trip to Amsterdam in reserve can’t do any harm.

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Give the Gift of Health https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/give_the_gift_of_health-16.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/give_the_gift_of_health-16.html#comments Mon, 18 Dec 2017 00:00:00 +0100 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/give_the_gift_of_health-16.html When the idea for Behomm was born, Agust and I were certain that a part of our earnings would go towards philanthropy. We have both been gifted with the immense luck one does not choose, the luck to have been born into this side of humanity, the side where we have healthcare, food, education… Moreover we deeply admire 

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When the idea for Behomm was born, Agust and I were certain that a part of our earnings would go towards philanthropy. We have both been gifted with the immense luck one does not choose, the luck to have been born into this side of humanity, the side where we have healthcare, food, education… Moreover we deeply admire those who commit their lives to others. A precious life goal.


After discovering the incredible work that architect Peter Williams and his team at Archive Global are doing, we immediately saw that it was a match with what we wanted to support: a non-for-profit where design is a key aspect in helping others.

 

Archive Global is an international non-profit organization based in New York using architectural design to combat disease around the world. They believe that adequate housing can drastically reduce the burden of disease and death in many impoverished communities worldwide.


Our commitment is to donate 5% of our Behomm profits to them. We are really working hard to make profits, not yet, but eventhough we are contributing with our personal savings.


Their team is made of architects, urban planners... our design profession colleagues.

In this season of giving, give the gift of health. Donate

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Meet the Behommers: Cécile Carré & Bruno Conigliano family https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommers:_cecile_carre___bruno_conigliano_family-19.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommers:_cecile_carre___bruno_conigliano_family-19.html#comments Thu, 03 Nov 2016 00:00:00 +0100 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommers:_cecile_carre___bruno_conigliano_family-19.html Cécile Carré (Nouméa, New Caledonia, 1973) and Bruno Conigliano (Mulhouse, France, 1974) are a French couple who have been living in Barcelona for more than 18 years. Both are architects d’interieur. They’ve traveled all around the world together with their three children: Gaspard, 13; Louise, 11; and Gabriel, 7. This family of travelers illustrate their destinations in colorful and poetic drawings. 

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Cécile Carré (Nouméa, New Caledonia, 1973) and Bruno Conigliano (Mulhouse, France, 1974) are a French couple who have been living in Barcelona for more than 18 years. Both are architects d’interieur. They’ve traveled all around the world together with their three children: Gaspard, 13; Louise, 11; and Gabriel, 7. This family of travelers illustrate their destinations in colorful and poetic drawings. Be sure to enjoy their video (see below).


You’ve been all around the world. Tell us about your trips.

Before having the kids, our first trip was to Indonesia. It was a trip that we really wanted to do because in our school, l’École Boulle in Paris, a really important part of our studies had to do with observation and observation drawing. We were taught that the best way to understand something is to draw it.

 

We became really interested in this topic and we decided to go on a trip to Indonesia to make a study of the vernacular architecture. We returned to Paris with a lot of drawings. We loved it. I think that’s a little bit of the reason why we kept traveling like that: to actually discover new cultures and places, to know what is behind the images that are sold to us.

 

We didn’t go to touristic places. We went from little town to little town where we slept at people’s houses. Wooden houses, where we slept on the floor with the other members of the family. It was an incredible experience, both in the professional and personal field. Especially the second one, it was really touching and shaped us somehow. And since then we always have this urge to discover, to get to know new countries in depth when we travel.


What came after?

After that we went to Central America. And then came our most important trip. It was our honeymoon. We went from Istanbul to Peking. It was a road trip. We went through Turkey, Iran, Pakistan, India, Nepal and from there we flew to Thailand, Cambodia, Vietnam, Laos and China. All over land borders. On the way back home we took the Trans-Siberian Railway. It was important for us to come back slowly while crossing time at full speed. It was amazing, the best way to end our trip.


Is there any special anecdote from that trip?
The funniest thing is that we financed the trip with our wedding gifts. We went backpacking, so our wedding registry was a bunch of different bundles such as “bus ticket to go from one place to another” so people could participate in a specific detail of the trip. It was really nice. And while traveling, we had a list with every gift and the person that gave it to us so that we could send a postcard whenever we got to that place, which was our unique thank you note. 


And this trip lasted a year... Well, actually, ten months. Afterwards we spent two months thinking about where to establish our lives. It was during this time that we edited our book. It was a book full of the drawings we had done during the trip. It was really interesting to be able to share our experiences with more people.


And with the kids, what was your first trip?

[Her daughter, Louise, answers]: Bali.

Yes. We went back to Bali with the kids. We went when Louise was 3 and Gaspard 5 years old. As a start with the kids, we wanted an easy yet exotic country. Bali is an amazing place with spectacular aesthetics. The food is great and people are so nice and adorable... It's pretty small so it's easy to move around.


Where did you stay with the kids? Were you still backpacking?

Yes. Well... with the kids we stayed at better places than when it was just the two of us. But yes, we always stayed at guesthouses.


Weren’t you scared about your children’s health?

No. In fact, when you’re used to traveling, you can feel it. You acquire reflexes. It’s something that you learn while traveling. A one-year trip is a little bit like a school. You learn that everything has a solution.


What is the biggest challenge while traveling with kids?

With the kids? Ufff... to make them happy. That’s the big challenge, especially now that they’re getting older. When they’re little, they don’t care. They enjoy themselves with anything and everything. But now... Gaspard is already a teenager, we should ask him what he thinks about our last trip. At some points I think they got a bit bored. 


Where else did you go with your children?

After Bali, Gabriel was born and we went in a camper van through Sweden and Norway, which was really nice and fun. It was a two-week trip. Gabriel was 9 months old. We had a blast, really beautiful.


Wow, how is it to travel with a little baby?

Well... He didn’t walk so was really easy, he didn’t cry. Not even on the plane when we spent 15 hours flying, the kids didn’t care. Nor when we were in the camper van. It was always really nice.


Gaspard enters the room and we ask him and Louise about their favorite trip:

[Louise]: Indonesia.

[Gaspard]: Malaysia.

[Cécile]: Yes, Malaysia was really fun. We spent a long time at the beach. We stayed one week in Phuket, two weeks at the Perhentian and afterwards we went down across the jungles with the train that crosses the center of Malaysia until we got to Kuala Lumpur. We went to see elephants and other things more enjoyable for the kids.


What other trips have you done with them?

After Malaysia we went to Ladakh, the Tibetan part of India. It is a really small piece of land where you can see China, Pakistan Afghanistan and of course India at the same time. It's really special. 


Is Ladakh where you took those pictures where you’re showing your sketch pad to some monks?

Yes, exactly. And this was for the kids... Well, it was really quiet and nice. I don’t know if they liked it… because there was not much beach.  [Looks at Louise and Gaspard and smiles]

 

[Louise]: Il n’y avait rien à faire...

 

That’s true. There was not much to do. Every day we went to pray at 5 in the morning for two hours. It was a different experience.


Every day?

Well... we went a couple of times [laughs]. It was a time to think, to relax... We drew a lot and we spent time contemplating. I think it was really important and good for them. They have had to learn that one doesn’t have to be always active, doing stuff with more people. It’s been a good training process for them.


One has to know how to get bored too; whenever you’re bored is when creativity occurs, right?

That’s what they say! I think it was a good school for them because they’re neither really in need of attention all the time nor do they have to be doing something 24/7. However, nowadays it’s much easier with their phones and such... [Sighs and smiles]


You said you’re not scared about your kids’ health. Were you never sick during your trips?

Oh yes... Once in Pakistan with Bruno! We ate the spiciest food imaginable. It was awful... My tongue was like... I had the feeling my tongue was like a steak on fire.

 

We were also sick during our wedding trip, in Laos. But I think there was a huge psychological factor too. We’d been traveling for seven months and when we got there we bumped into a friend of Bruno’s by coincidence. Her husband was the doctor at the French embassy and they invited us to stay with them for a week. On the second day, we were both in bed completely sick... But no, we never had any problem. I think is also because we’re cautious, as I said before.


You travel mostly around Asia, right?

Yes, we love it. It’s an incredible place where the people are really peaceful and nice. The food is amazing and they have unique and impressive aesthetics. Also, when you’re traveling with kids. We’re five. Everything becomes more expensive. Asia – at least for the moment – was a pretty inexpensive area.


How do you prepare for your trips? Do you plan them or do you like to improvise?

We plan them a lot more since having the children. For example, Malaysia, we planned a lot. Gabriel was really young so we didn’t want to get somewhere and not have a place to sleep. However, some other trips cannot be planned as much. Like the one we made to Myanmar. There were places like Dawei where you couldn’t find a place to search for guesthouses or hotels on the Internet.


Do you have any anecdote of this trip to Myanmar?

It was an incredible but also a “hard” trip. It depends if you’re used to traveling and where you’ve been. I remember the kids... we didn’t see a tourist for days, more than a week! The first time we saw one Gaspard screamed “Ah! Look a friend!!!” 


Let’s talk about your drawings. When do you do it? Do you stop, sit somewhere and start drawing? All of you?

Yes. Well not always the five of us. The kids are not always in the mood. Especially as they grow older.


Do you each have your own scrapbook?

Yes, each of us travels with his/her own scrapbook and own material.


Is it spontaneous? Do you see something you like and you suddenly stop and draw it?

Well... Now I’m talking just about Bruno and I. Sometimes the kids just have to adapt to the situation. We love the rhythm that a drawing day offers you.

 

Especially because when you’re traveling you’re standing all the time; observing stuff, visiting places... And when we made our one-year trip we loved the possibilities that drawing while traveling gave us. It’s also the fact that you’re not just static while standing and looking something. No, you get to have some kind of intellectual activity, which is especially important when you travel for a long time. In our opinion you need something; drawing, writing, taking pictures... something. It keeps you awake. 

 

It also gives you the opportunity to interact with a lot of people. They get close to you to check what you’re drawing, to ask you stuff... It’s really funny. And it puts you in situations you’d never be without drawing. We always have a lot of fun.


Tell us about your Behomm experience.

We did our first exchange last year, in Italy. We stayed at Milan. Bruno was the architect for one of the Expo pavilions, so we went there to enjoy the Expo. We exchanged with a really nice family from Milan. They have a vintage store with brands and well-known/famous designers. But their house... It was incredible. It was full of original pieces. Breath-taking! 


What’s next on your wish list?

Well... these past days a Behomm member offered us a new exchange. Reykjavik. Iceland sounds just amazing! We’re actually looking forward to it.


Wow, Iceland... We’ve heard is incredible. How nice!

Yes, the truth is that after all these trips visiting temples, and amazing architecture... I need a country with powerful landscapes, with nature. When I got the exchange offer I said, “Why not?”. We’re excited! 


After all of your travels, what do you think is the world’s biggest challenge?

I think that... oh I make a lot of theories lately. Either “something” comes and saves us from what we’re doing here on Earth, or we’re done. Humanity will be extinct soon. The Earth will still be here, but it doesn’t need us! It’s been here for millions of years, always finding its way out of everything... Dinosaurs, ice ages... everything. I mean, mankind is nothing here on Earth.

 

And we’re messing it up in big dimensions. In this last era of industrialization, we’ve hurt nature more than in the thousands of years that man has been living on Earth. We’re killing what gives us life. It’s a really fatalistic view, but I think it’s pretty realistic as well. We need to be aware of it.


You’ve been in a lot of underdeveloped countries. What do you think we can learn from them?

I believe we must help each other. They should teach us how to live and be happy with fewer things; they know how to do it and we’ve forgotten.

 

On the other hand, we have to teach those countries about human rights; everything that we know. Developed societies have a lot of good qualities too.

 

One way to do it is... Well, whenever I travel with the kids, It provides a lot of opportunities to talk with them about a variety of topics, such as the controversy regarding the veil for women, freedom... I know it wouldn’t be so easy to teach these things from home.


It’s been really inspiring to talk to you today. There are no right paths; the one that each person goes on is just an option. There is an infinite amount of ways to happiness.

I think whichever way you choose is the correct one. You always have to open doors for new opportunities. The other day I was listening to Jean-Claude Carrière, a French philosopher-novelist. He said “I’ve never planned anything in my life”, “never had a defined path to go through”, “but whatever I’ve done I’ve always done it well and giving my best”. I think that’s what brought him to success.


I think in the end, being successful doesn’t mean public success, nor having a lot of money. To me success is when on your last day, you can look back and say, “I’ve lived the best way possible, and it has shown results”. To live a life you’re proud of.

 

- -

Interview by Marta Martínez Feijoo and Júlia Juste 

Cécile Carré & Bruno Conigliano Home ID: 743

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Meet the Behommer: Ed Reeve, photographer https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommer:_ed_reeve__photographer-18.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommer:_ed_reeve__photographer-18.html#comments Wed, 25 May 2016 16:32:52 +0200 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommer:_ed_reeve__photographer-18.html Ed (Torbay, UK, 1972) is an architectural and interiors photographer working mostly for luxury brand retail and restaurants. In August it will be 21 years since his first commission. His client list includes Alexander McQueen, Stella McCartney, D&G, David Adjaye, Balenciaga, Conde Nast Traveller, Jimmy Choo and Virgin Atlantic to name just a few.  

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Ed (Torbay, UK, 1972) is an architectural and interiors photographer working mostly for luxury brand retail and restaurants. In August it will be 21 years since his first commission. His client list includes Alexander McQueen, Stella McCartney, D&G, David Adjaye, Balenciaga, Conde Nast Traveller, Jimmy Choo and Virgin Atlantic to name just a few. 


His wife Micha is a professional dancer performing mostly with Sir Matthew Bourne’s company - New Adventures but also in productions for the National Theatre and in film. She has had leading roles in Swan Lake, The Car Man, Edward Scissor-Hands, Dorian Grey, Cinderella and The Nutcracker. She’s returning to the stage this autumn in a new production of The Red Shoes. 


They met while both working for Alexander McQueen at one of his fashion shows in Paris. Ed was taking pictures back stage for McQueen and Micha was one of the models in the show. Based on the Sydney Pollack film “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?” made in 1969 and set in the Great Depression of the 1930s, it made for an enthralling show. Anna Wintour stated it was her favourite show at McQueens Memorial years later which they all attended at St Paul’s Cathedral. They now have two children, Amalia who just turned 4 and Lorenzo who’s 1. 


What inspires you?

Architecture mostly. I am fascinated and excited by the changing landscapes, especially of our cities. I’ve been in London for 23 years and it’s gone through enormous change. 


Your passions?

I love architecture and good design but I’m also passionate about the natural landscape. I love to be in the mountains. Cycling up them in the summer and snowboarding down them in the winter. I hope one day to have a home amongst the Dolomites. They are so majestic. We had a 2 week holiday in the Lake District of Northern Italy last summer. It has everything we could want from a vacation; cycling, walking, swimming in the lakes and fantastic food, all amongst stunning scenery.


Tell us what you like from your home and why?

My favourite aspect of our home is the top floor. The large panoramic window faces west onto an oak tree. In the evening the warm light from the setting sun filters through the tree to create moving dappled light around the room. It’s like having animated wallpaper. It’s a magical place to wind down at the end of the day. There’s also a hatch to the roof so we can grab a beer from the bar fridge in the lounge and head up there to watch the sunset.


The place where you have been most happy?

That’s tough. I’ve felt feelings of great happiness both at home and abroad. I often feel overwhelmed with happiness when watching my kids. It’s a magical time of life and seems to get better as they grow. But festivals particularly with friends in my 20’s and 30’s conjure up many happy memories too. We’re planning to go to a couple of festivals this summer with our kids so it’ll be a different but wonderful experience. 


An unforgettable trip?

I took 6 months out and went travelling through South America. I saw landscape that I never imagined and captured some of the best images in my portfolio. It was a great adventure. I came back a changed person. You can see some of the images from this trip on the travel section of my website. 


Your Behomm experiences?

I’ve already formed some friendships through Behomm. There’s so many like minded people who are happy not only to share their homes but their lifestyle and local knowledge too. 


What do you like of the community?

It’s so much more than swapping accommodation. It’s a privileged insight and a source of inspiration.


If you’d like to add any other thought… please do so

My father passed away in March. Shortly before he died I asked him for any life advise he could offer. He paused for considered thought then replied “Holidays!, when you look back over your life it’s the holidays you remember so take as many as you can”. He’s so right. Days at the office can all roll into one but it’s the days spent on holiday with loved one’s that are the memories we cherish. Behomm gives us the opportunity to increase these moments so we intend to have many holidays, even short breaks. It’s important to do, especially with family.

 

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Home ID: 245 (photos below)

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Meet the Behommer: Jen Taylor, architect & textile pattern designer https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommer:_jen_taylor__architect___textile_pattern_designer-17.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommer:_jen_taylor__architect___textile_pattern_designer-17.html#comments Fri, 01 Apr 2016 11:02:23 +0200 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommer:_jen_taylor__architect___textile_pattern_designer-17.html Jen (Hong Kong, 1974) is an architect dedicated to incorporating design into the everyday. Born in Asia, she is English at heart and was raised in the UK from the age of 15. It was there that she studied, and worked, and met her partner, architect Hari Philips. Together they have a son. In 2012 Jen started up her own textile business 

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Jen (Hong Kong, 1974) is an architect dedicated to incorporating design into the everyday. Born in Asia, she is English at heart and was raised in the UK from the age of 15. It was there that she studied, and worked, and met her partner, architect Hari Philips. Together they have a son. In 2012 Jen started up her own textile business “Hokolo” (from Hong Kong London). The company was born in response to an urgent need. “ I wanted to be there for my new born son” she says.


“Architecture is my passion, but it can also be frustrating. in between designing a project and construction, there can be an interminable waiting period. With textile design, on the other hand, you can see the product almost instantly”.

 

Inspired by the quintisentially British (from eggs and blueberries for breakfast to locally sourced lambs wool), she began to silkscreen fabric with strong graphics and bold colors. The results are clothing and fabrics for home decorating that are modern and accesible. Jen’s vibrant designs can be found not only in her own home but are increasingly popular items for British interior design lovers.

 

Jen’s home, is modern, colorful, and cheerful. Artistic elements abound, from smiley faced prints to playful pillows that put a smile on your face. The open spaces in the architecture add to the fresh atmosphere, creating a vibrant harmony between the furniture and the accessories, they are not, just decoration but a vital part of the whole space. Jen believes “Good design is part of our everyday life, it’s what makes each day special and unique”.


Jennifer’s Behomm experience


“No two houses are the same. The first place we stayed was an enormous house in an exclusive part of Madrid. it was beautifully decorated and very practical. There was an amazing coffee maker that we used every day… we loved it so much that we bought the same one when we got home!” “We also had a fantastic experience when we stayed in Barcelona. That flat had stunning views of the city, and was full of interesting works of art. In Rome we stayed in a flat that was full of beautiful antiques and books. Just recently we were in a rustic country house in iceland”.

 

“We feel a sense of security with Behomm, because we know that it is only for invited guests, like a private club. We know we’ll meet people who share our general interests, but perhaps with a different lifestyle. it’s an experience that even a 6 star hotel couldn’t provide”.

 

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Interview by Ana Martínez Nebot  

Jen Taylor Home ID: 18 (photos below)

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Meet the Behommer: Luis Úrculo, artist https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommer:_luis_urculo__artist-15.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommer:_luis_urculo__artist-15.html#comments Thu, 18 Jun 2015 20:30:43 +0200 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommer:_luis_urculo__artist-15.html Luis Úrculo (Madrid, 1978) is an artist. He explores all that is peripheral to architecture – the processes, developments and approaches that can be manipulated, sampled and translated into other scales through such diverse mediums as performance and video art. Qualified with his architecture degree 

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Luis Úrculo (Madrid, 1978) is an artist. He explores all that is peripheral to architecture – the processes, developments and approaches that can be manipulated, sampled and translated into other scales through such diverse mediums as performance and video art. Qualified with his architecture degree from ETSAM, scholarships from Illinois Institute of Technology and the Chicago Institute of Design. He lives and works between Madrid, Mexico DF and New York.


Úrculo’s house “is a kitchen” jokes the artist in earnest, It’s an old house in Madrid, redesigned to “accomodate my life and my friends”. The kitchen is enormous. “It’s more than a kitchen. It’s the heart of the home, the fire, the place where friends and family get together”.

 

“Although I live alone, my house is always full of people. It’s very important to me that every day I stop working and take a couple of hours to cook, and enjoy eating and talking with friends. The kitchen is my social space. The library, on the other hand, is my map of the world. A cabinet of curiosities, where, besides books, I keep my collection of stuff, objects that have captured my imagination from my travels”.

 

“I see traveling as an exploration. I go to seek out a new world, and see what discoveries I can bring back with me. I like to collect things. I choose my destinations very carefully, and stay as long as I can, in order to understand the people and connect to their culture”.


“It’s fascinating. When you’re in a new place there’s this tremendous need to discover and understand everything. It makes you construct a mental map of the society, and the culture in your head. It’s amazing”.

 

Úrculo’s Behomm experience

“Now that I’m dividing my time between Madrid, Mexico and New York, my house is empty a lot of the time. That’s why I joined Behomm. Thanks to them I was able to swap homes with an artist from New York on my last trip, and to experience another creative environment”.

 

“Staying in the homes of other creative people is really rewarding, it’s about how people inhabit their space as much as what it contains. There is always something about the space and its contents that reflect that particular place, and the people who live there”.


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Luis Úrculo Home ID: 554

Interview by Ana Martínez Nebot  

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Meet the Behommers: Anna & Eugeni Bach, architects https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommers:_anna___eugeni_bach__architects-14.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommers:_anna___eugeni_bach__architects-14.html#comments Thu, 26 Mar 2015 16:00:48 +0100 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/meet_the_behommers:_anna___eugeni_bach__architects-14.html Anna (Finland, 1973) and Eugeni (Barcelona, 1974) are young architects, who are internationally acclaimed for their ecological designs. They prove that even with a limited budget, it’s possible to create beautiful and environmentally friendly houses.  

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Anna (Finland, 1973) and Eugeni (Barcelona, 1974) are young architects, who are internationally acclaimed for their ecological designs. They prove that even with a limited budget, it’s possible to create beautiful and environmentally friendly houses.


They renovated their own home which pays homage to Modernist design from the early 20th century. Located in the elegant and bohemian “Eixample” neighborhood in Barcelona, populated with art galleries, charming shops and bars. Their apartment is full of lovely period details like mosaic floors, and detailed moldings around the ceilings. “The idea” they explain, “was to preserve the spirit and memory of the original structure”. “Restoration is about valuing what already exists, respecting the essence of the place, careful preservation”.


Anna and Eugeni approached their house like a puzzle, taking advantage of every opportunity to fit together the furnishings in subtle and harmonious ways that accomodate them and their two children, Uma and Rufus. It is an elegant tribute to history, to “Modernismo”.


Their first Behomm experience
“We exchanged homes with Vienese architects who we felt we had something in common with. Their whole house, the interior, the garden, the fireplace, all spoke of family life”. 


“When you travel with kids, a proper family home gives you freedom, and a chance to relax even if the weather is bad. The kids were able to play in their own rooms, while we relaxed in front of the fire with a nice bottle of wine. Also, with the money we saved on accomodation, we were able to stay longer. A hotel would have been a disaster. We were away on holiday, but it felt like being home”. 


“What made the experience extra special were the little things, like the personal recommendations that the owners had left for us about their favourite breakfast place, or a particular walk we might enjoy, it felt like having access to a secret guidebook!”. 

 

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Anna & Eugeni Bach Home ID: 406

Interview by Ana Martínez Nebot   I   Photos by Tiia Ettala

 

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9 Secrets About Home Exchange You Should Know https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/9_secrets_about_home_exchange_you_should_know_-11.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/9_secrets_about_home_exchange_you_should_know_-11.html#comments Thu, 12 Feb 2015 00:00:00 +0100 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/9_secrets_about_home_exchange_you_should_know_-11.html Hope these "secrets" about home exchange help you. Many go deeper than the ones in the home exchange guide we wrote, which all our members 

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Hope these "secrets" about home exchange help you. Many go deeper than the ones in the home exchange guide we wrote, which all our members already have. Enjoy! 


1. The faster you close a home exchange, the better.


After our personal home exchange experiences, we’ve realized that the faster you close a home exchange, the better. 


If you get a home exchange offer and you really want to do it, reply quickly, agree on dates, fill in the agreement and close it. If you wait a couple of days to reply the first message or leave it open for the future with an answer like “Let's be in contact again in 2-3 months and agree on dates then", you may lose the exchange. 

 

It’s not necessary to be pushy, but when the opportunity arrives, if you’re interested, negotiate and close it fast! 



2. Upload photos of your surroundings.


Since launching Behomm, we've noticed that members who upload images of the interesting places in their sorroundings in addition to their home photos receive more exchange offers.

 

If you live in a city, upload the charming bar around the corner or the nicest street in your neighborhood. If you live out of a city, show your landscapes, the nearest beach, your town’s streets. Some people are lazy about reading… But we all look at photos! 


Another tip: members that upload their portrait and family photos receive more exchange offers. They increase trust. We all like to see the faces of potential home exchange partners.



3. Use the agreement, even if you are an experienced exchanger.

 

Recently a very experienced member told us "I always close my home exchanges with an agreement and with this last one I didn't and I regret it." These members had a misunderstanding about dates. They solved it, but they would have avoided it with the agreement. 

 

Using the agreement is a must. You'll avoid misunderstandings. 


The Behomm agreement form is a very helpful tool, as it lists all the things you should agree upon with your guests. Find it at the bottom menu of our members' private area. 


4. Buy air tickets after your guests' air flight approval, not before.

 
Even if you closed an exchange using the agreement, before buying your air tickets, first send to your home exchange guests the flight details you found, and wait for their approval that the dates, arrival and departure times are fine with them. Then buy your air tickets. 


5. Cleaning.

 
Cleaning is the most common problem of home exchange, not security (insurance companies often advise that your house is safer from theft and vandalism with people living inside than it is empty). Cleaning habits vary among countries. Make sure to leave your home very clean, and your guests home as clean as you found it. 


You can also agree to exchange the cleaning of homes upon departure. This might mean that when you arrive you will find your exchange home clean, but when you leave you won't have to clean it. Remember, though, this must always be arranged and agreed upon in advance.


6. Anything is possible, just negotiate it.

 
We remember the odd feelings and questions we had before doing our first home exchange. We asked an experienced exchanger: "Can we home exchange in different dates?" His reply was short and very useful: "Everything is possible in home exchange, just negotiate it with the other party." Exchanges can include bikes, opera season tickets, mothers-in-law... Anything is possible, just negotiate it.

 

 

7. Don't miss the best part, meet your guests.


Recently members Teresa and Daniel from Barcelona wrote us, excited, once back from a New York exchange: "Best of all, certainly not the fact of exchanging homes, it's meeting people, what they do, how they live, and all their world, an amazing experience." 

 

Some home exchangers never meet their guests... They miss the best part of doing home exchange! 


Welcome the enrichment that cultural exchange gives you: interesting people you can learn from and laugh with... The people you exchange with may become friends.

 


8. The spirit of home exchange.

 
The spirit... the attitude when doing home exchange is not about saving money. It’s about treating your home exchange partners as your guests. Be as kind and as generous as possible.

 

We love how member Alex Trochut, an illustrator who lives in New York and Barcelona, explained the exchange experience to the journalist of The New York Times: “It goes way beyond sharing a home — you share your lives, the Behomm experience is very opposite of renting, because you feel entitled to things when you pay for them. This is about giving and not receiving.”


9. Warning: Behomm is addictive!

 

Many members have told us that when they want to relax they log in to Behomm and enjoy looking at the inspiring homes as when they look at a magazine :-) 

 

Also, and primarily, what’s really addictive is the feeling after a home exchange.

You’ll reaffirm your faith in human beings, you enjoyed life without paying any money on accommodation and people have shared what they had... You’ll feel a better world is possible! 


Happy Behomm exchanges!

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Fun and Creative Gift for Kids All Ages (0-99) https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/fun_and_creative_gift_for_kids_all_ages_(0_99)-13.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/fun_and_creative_gift_for_kids_all_ages_(0_99)-13.html#comments Thu, 04 Dec 2014 00:00:00 +0100 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/fun_and_creative_gift_for_kids_all_ages_(0_99)-13.html You'll find circus lions, spacecrafts, precious diamonds, angry monsters, romantic flowers, fire cats, tiny cactus, quail feathers, sheriff badges... in colors, metallic, white and ones that glow in the dark. Designed by talented  

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You'll find circus lions, spacecrafts, precious diamonds, angry monsters, romantic flowers, fire cats, tiny cactus, quail feathers, sheriff badges... in colors, metallic, white and ones that glow in the dark. Designed by talented world-wide creatives, some members of Behomm.

 

Last Christmas the Three Wise Men brought home these fun temporary tattoos, which we loved. We thought next Holidays we'd share this playful, creative and inexpensive gift idea with all of you.


Which do you like best?

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Code of Ethics on Home Exchange https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/code_of_ethics_on_home_exchange_-12.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/code_of_ethics_on_home_exchange_-12.html#comments Thu, 30 Oct 2014 10:17:17 +0100 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/code_of_ethics_on_home_exchange_-12.html For our first post about home exchange, we'd like to start with the Code of Ethics: what is a must and we should be very careful of when doing a home exchange. Some points may sound 

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For our first post about home exchange, we'd like to start with the Code of Ethics: what is a must and we should be very careful of when doing a home exchange. Some points may sound very obvious, but better to list them all and have them fresh in our minds.


1. Treat your exchange partners as your guests!

Home exchange partners are your guests. This is the attitude to have when doing home exchange.


At Behomm we believe home exchange is not just about finding free accommodations around the world... it’s about sharing and making personal connections that cross oceans, continents and cultures. Be as kind and generous as possible.


2. Never break an exchange agreement.

Signing an agreement is like signing a rental contract. You should only break it under a real emergency; for example, death of a family member or a terrible illness which prevents you from travelling. If it happens, you should work hard to find another home for your guests.

 

3. Respect the home where you stay.

Take extremely good care of your exchange partner's belongings and home as if they were your own. Be careful not to break anything.


4. In case of any damage.

In case of any damage, repair the items involved or replace them, and clearly inform your exchange partners about it.


5. Be honest about your home and area description.

Don’t exaggerate. Explain any downside. You don’t want your guests to be disappointed. 
We personally explain in our own listing that our bedrooms are very small and the exterior of our building not beautiful.


6. Negotiation.

It is better not to negotiate a home exchange with several members of the same location at the same time. If you do so, you will have one happy member but also several disappointed members.

 

Sending exchange offers to several members in the same location at the same time only makes sense for members living in less attractive locations, because they need it to have more probability in order to find an exchange.


7. Leave your home very clean, organized and well maintained.

While cleaning standards are different among countries and people, you should always do your best to leave your home very clean and in order; also repair anything that does not work.


8. No deposits.

Home exchange is based on honesty and trust. When using Behomm, there are no money transactions or deposits of any kind between members.


9. Share your favorite places.

Leave a map with your favorite restaurants, shops, art exhibitions, hidden squares, and whatever else you think they might enjoy. Tell your guests what to see and what to avoid! They’ll be very grateful. 


A must? Yes, we think so! Living as a local is one of the best things about home exchange and owners' recommendations make the difference!

 

10. If you want to invite friends over…

If, while doing a home exchange, you want to invite a friend or friends over for lunch, a visit or the night and that person/s are not specified on the agreement as persons of the exchange stay, it is important to ask for special permission from the home owners before they come over. Agreements are made under a trust that the owners know who is in their home at all times.


11. Leave the home where you stayed as clean as you found it.

Upon your departure at the end of your stay, leave the home as clean as you found it upon arrival, unless you have agreed to exchange the cleaning (this might mean that when you arrive you will find your exchange home clean, but when you leave you won't have to clean it. Remember, though, this must always be arranged and agreed upon in advance).


12. Polite touches.

Welcoming your guests with a bottle of wine, some flowers and a traditional meal from your country in the fridge is more than appreciated; it makes the first moment of the stay something special! We are personally so grateful when we arrive tired, after long hours of travelling, to find some nice food waiting for us.


At your departure, leaving a thank you note and/or a small gift, gives the same feeling.

 

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Please let us know your comments... if you would add more points, change some.

We'll be grateful for your feedback! :-)  

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An Interview Difficult to Forget! https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/an_interview_difficult_to_forget!-10.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/an_interview_difficult_to_forget!-10.html#comments Thu, 07 Aug 2014 21:06:13 +0200 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/an_interview_difficult_to_forget!-10.html While validating our new member from Granada, Antonio Jiménez Torrecillas, Spanish National Prize of Architecture, we discovered his beautiful interview for the documentary “Spain Alight”, directed by Jorge Cosmen, talking about the influence of light for Spanish creatives. 

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While validating our new member from Granada, Antonio Jiménez Torrecillas, Spanish National Prize of Architecture, we discovered his beautiful interview for the documentary “Spain Alight”, directed by Jorge Cosmen, talking about the influence of light for Spanish creatives.


Two other relevant figures of the Spanish artistic world are interviewed: the artist Daniel Canogar and Joan Gaspar, industrial designer.


We loved the film and especially the interview to Antonio Jiménez (at 12' minute).

His sensibility, his reflections about light and architecture... the way he explains it, so poetic and understanding at the same time. His words reminds us the subtil book of Japanese writer Tanizaki, "In Praise of Shadows"... that cosy semi-darkness. 


After the interview, "El Bañuelo", the XI Century Arab baths in Granada, will be in your wish list too, for sure... with "a light difficult to forget" as Antonio comments.


Enjoy this interesting 42' documentary, worth watching! 

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Amazing Museum for Enjoying Art and Nature https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/amazing_museum_for_enjoying_art_and_nature-9.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/amazing_museum_for_enjoying_art_and_nature-9.html#comments Mon, 02 Jun 2014 18:42:23 +0200 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/amazing_museum_for_enjoying_art_and_nature-9.html During our home exchange in Copenhagen we discovered the unforgettable Louisiana Museum of Modern Art. One of the best museums we have ever visited. It reminds us our beloved Chillida Leku Museum in the Basque country. The Louisiana buildings are surrounded by a beautiful garden full of old, amazing trees... 

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During our home exchange in Copenhagen we discovered the unforgettable Louisiana Museum of Modern Art. One of the best museums we have ever visited. It reminds us our beloved Chillida Leku Museum in the Basque country. 


The Louisiana buildings are surrounded by a beautiful garden full of old, amazing trees and sculptures by Henry Moore, Alexander Calder... and a fantastic sea view. The museum’s permanent collection features works by Giacometti, Picasso, Warhol, Hockney and more. 

 

The museum has a vibrant Children's Wing with great activities. Our kids were amazed.

The perfect place to go with them and let their imagination fly. 


Besides the Lousiana Museum, we loved the city of Copenhagen. Now there are 40 Behomm members in Copenhagen and the area. A great choice for the coming summer vacations. 

 

Enjoy!

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Don't Miss "La Grande Bellezza" Film https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/don_t_miss__la_grande_bellezza__film-8.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/don_t_miss__la_grande_bellezza__film-8.html#comments Fri, 24 Jan 2014 17:08:23 +0100 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/don_t_miss__la_grande_bellezza__film-8.html You'll like this special movie by Paolo Sorrentino. Exquisite beauty! The music, the images, the acid critique of empty life, the decadence, Rome and its glory, the parties... Can anyone please invite us to one of these parties? Beloved Fellini —please stand up— is there. Unforgettable Jep Gambardella character depicted by 

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You'll like this special movie by Paolo Sorrentino. Exquisite beauty! The music, the images, the acid critique of empty life, the decadence, Rome and its glory, the parties... Can anyone please invite us to one of these parties?

 

Beloved Fellini —please stand up— is there. Unforgettable Jep Gambardella character depicted by talented Toni Servillo. A must to see it in its original version, Italian.


A good opportunity for us to recommend listing your nearest independent/arthouse cinema in your exchange guide. Your home exchange guests will love to know.


Enjoy the film!

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In Love with Marion Deuchars' Books https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/in_love_with_marion_deuchars__books-7.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/in_love_with_marion_deuchars__books-7.html#comments Wed, 11 Dec 2013 18:34:03 +0100 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/in_love_with_marion_deuchars__books-7.html We absolutely love the interactive art books created by Marion Deuchars, British internationally renowned illustrator. They are creative, intelligent and fun. She developed these projects in an effort to keep her sons inspired and stimulated. She first published “Let’s Make Some Great Art", and afterwards “Let’s Make Great Fingerprint Art”. The books are a bomb of creativity... 

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We absolutely love the interactive art books created by Marion Deuchars, British internationally renowned illustrator. They are creative, intelligent and fun. She developed these projects in an effort to keep her sons inspired and stimulated.

 

She first published "Let's Make Some Great Art" and afterwards "Let's Make Great Fingerprint". The books are a bomb of creativity... truly encourage imagination, art and design.
Wish we would have had them when our kids were kids...

 

With these books, kids will learn that art is fun to create and that there are no boundaries.
"You can do whatever you want. It doesn't have to be true. All is in your imagination" says Marion Deuchars' youngest son in an interview to his mum by Design Observer.

 

A great present for your next home exchange guests if they have kids... or not!
Books for all ages. Enjoy!

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Exceptional Opera in Berlin next May 2014 https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/exceptional_opera_in_berlin_next_may_2014-6.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/exceptional_opera_in_berlin_next_may_2014-6.html#comments Wed, 20 Nov 2013 18:02:08 +0100 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/exceptional_opera_in_berlin_next_may_2014-6.html Don't miss this exceptional opera that we saw some years ago in Barcelona, performing again in Berlin next May. We're not opera experts, but this show is very special... a new contemporary concept of opera... the delicate Purcell music with exquisite choreography by Sasha Waltz... 

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Don't miss this exceptional opera that we saw some years ago in Barcelona, performing again in Berlin next May. We're not opera experts, but this show is very special... a new contemporary concept of opera... the delicate Purcell music with exquisite choreography by Sasha Waltz... a great excuse for a long weekend home exchange in Berlin. We already bought our tickets for Saturday May 10th. Please ignore the wrong date on the video... see tickets link for 2014 performances. Join us!

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Nani Marquina: One of our Favourite Shops in Barcelona https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/nani_marquina:_one_of_our_favourite_shops_in_barcelona__-3.html https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/nani_marquina:_one_of_our_favourite_shops_in_barcelona__-3.html#comments Fri, 22 Mar 2013 18:35:24 +0100 Behomm.com https://www.behomm.com/blog/post/nani_marquina:_one_of_our_favourite_shops_in_barcelona__-3.html For our first post to friends and members... we would love to share one of our favourite shops in Barcelona and pay homage to the exceptional Catalan artist Nani Marquina, world-renoun rug designer. We admire Nani Marquina for the beauty of her designs... for reinventing the rug concept... for matching traditional techniques and contemporary designs... 

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For our first post to friends and members... we would love to share one of our favourite shops in Barcelona and pay homage to the exceptional Catalan artist Nani Marquina, world-renoun rug designer. 


We admire Nani Marquina... for the beauty of her designs... for reinventing the rug concept... for matching traditional techniques and contemporary designs... for promoting fair trade and sustainable development... for her determination as a woman in business... and for her permanent smile. 


When you come to Barcelona, don't miss her shop, in our opinion one of the most beautiful showrooms in our city. It was a car wash tunnel, now converted to this exquisite space. Address: Rosselló, 256. Barcelona. 


Be sure to enjoy the video of her 25th company anniversary! (see below)

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